LIZARDIREN LEIHOAK III
Eduardo Chillida
SAN SEBáSTIAN 1924 - 2002 SAN SEBáSTIAN
LIZARDIREN LEIHOAK III
1983
ETCHING (RESIN)
SIGNED AND INDICATED LOWER LEFT: "CHILLIDA"
NUMBERED: IX/X
THE NUMBER OF EDITION I-V MENTIONED IN THE CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ,
WHICH MR. VAN DER KOELEN TOOK OUT OF THE HANDWRITTEN NOTEBOOK
OF THE PRINTER COULD BE MIXED UP SO THAT THE REAL NUMBER
OF EDITION IS I-X AS OUR WORK PROVES.

PRINTER:
TALLER HATZ, SAN SEBASTIÁN, SPAIN
PUBLISHER:
GALERÍA ANTONIO MACHON, MADRID


53.5 X 75.5 CM
PROVENANCE

GALERIE BIEDERMANN, MUNICH


PRIVATE COLLECTION, FRANKFURT


 

LITERATURE

MUSEO BARJOLA, GIJÓN 1990, P. 45


MUSEO MUNICIPAL, OURENSE 1992, NO. 37


MUSEO DE BELLAS ARTES, BILBAO 1986, P. 101

The sculptor and draughtsman Eduardo Chillida was born in San Sebástian, Spain in 1924. In 1943 he went to Madrid to study, initially architecture, which he abandoned four years later for artistic training at the Círculo de Bellas Artes, a private art academy in Madrid. Many of Chillida’s works, which he executed on a monumental scale from the late 1950s onward, have a political message. In 1958 he received the International Sculpture Prize at the Venice Biennale. Chillida’s œuvre is distinguished by his conception of three-dimensional art, which always focusses on space. Indeed, space and its metamorphoses constitute the central theme of the artist’s works. This thematic emphasis moreover forms the connecting link between his various forms of expression. According to Chillida, it is empty space that gives forms their shape. An almost palpable element in many of his works, emptiness is not deficiency but strength – entirely in the Heideggerian sense. In dialogue with philosophy, the artist conceives of his art as the creation and visualization of places. Not only his sculptures but also his works of printmaking adhere to this way of thinking, and strive to enable the recognition and comprehension of the inconceivable. Chillida’s graphic œuvre encompasses more than five hundred works. In particular the prints in black and white, for example the one of view here, derive their impact from the rich contrast between these two colours. In 1967/68, black became Chillida’s most important artistic medium. Through the precise placement of the black and white surfaces, this print takes on an almost paper-cut-like quality. As in many of Chillida’s prints, it is virtually impossible to distinguish between what is space and what is form: that is how closely the two interlock here. The abstract forms in black and white not only cast a spell over the beholder with their inherent dynamic, but in their simplicity also succeed in touching him emotionally.