HOMME DÉVOILANT UNE FEMME (MAN UNCOVERING A WOMAN)
FIGURE AVEC RAYONSTête de FauneHOMME DÉVOILANT UNE FEMME (MAN UNCOVERING A WOMAN)COLOMBE VOLANT
Pablo Picasso
MáLAGA 1881 - 1973 MOUGINS
HOMME DÉVOILANT UNE FEMME (MAN UNCOVERING A WOMAN)
1931
DRYPOINT ON VERGÉ DE MONTVAL-PAPER

45 X 33.7 CM
PROVENANCE

COLLECTION PETIET (RELIEF-SEAL ON THE FRONT SIDE AND SEAL OF COLLECTION ON THE REAR „ HMP“), PARIS  


GALLERY PROUTÉ, PARIS


PRIVATE COLLECTION, ZURICH

LITERATURE

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉE: GEISER BAER, PICASSO PEINTRE-GRAVEUR, TOME I,  CATALOGUE ILLUSTRÉ DE L'OEUVRE GRAVÉ ET LITHOGRAPHIÉ 1899-1931. FIRST EDITION: BERN, 1933.


 

Pablo Picasso has been designated as „magician of graphic“.[1] This denotation does not just include the enormous creativity oft the artist concerning this field of activity. It refers equally to the elementary and startling style, his technical mastery, his craftsmanship and his fondness in experimenting. Parallel to his merely countable painterly and graphic Œuvre he created one of the most important body of graphic reproductions of his times. It allowed him to experiment with lines and contrasts of black and white, between colour and primer in a way more consequent manner than in painting. The so-called „Suite Vollard“, created between 1930 and 1937, is likely to be one of the most admired ones amongst Picassos graphic reproductions. Named after the famous art dealer Ambroise Vollard (1866-1939), who realized the first exhibition for the young artist in 1901, Picasso created a fascinating series of hundred prints, which represents this enormously rich period of creation in a perfect way. The different variations represent topics as artist and model, the myth of Minotaurus and the sculptor’s atelier. Moreover Picasso shows his artistic study of Rembrandt in a masterly way and proves his technical skills through abundant motifs.  It is assumed that Picasso ceded this series to Vollard in return of two paintings by Renoir and Cézanne. After the unattended death of his facilitator in 1939 the corresponding prints passed into the property of the collector and publisher Petiet via the art dealer Fabiani. The print here on display belongs to the “Suite Vollard.” It shows a naked man who is uncovering a woman lying under a sheet. In this motif Picasso combines clear and simple lines with dense hatchings and soft shades - as if outlined by brush. These parts show an intense, modelled character. At this point the confrontation of differing means of creation that are left without alignment on purpose becomes evident. One sketchily accented, almost “unfinished” element is opposed to a fully executed one. It seems as if Picasso intended to contrast the notions two-dimensional and spatial or to exemplify a sentence he once said during a conversation with Kahnweiler: In contrast to painting, who will always be the art of imitation, “only line drawing is no emulation", but has "innate, man-created light". [2] The relation between man an woman is a recurrent motif in the Œuvre of the artist and shows the important role of the woman as a model, muse, mother, wife and mistress in his life and work. In the present work this kind of erotic homage is enhanced with a voyeuristic motif, which origins are to be found in antiquity. This unique print refers to the virtuosity of the great master and carries unmistakably in its signum - consisting of vitality, sensuality and artistic genius the imprint of the greatest artist of the twentieth century.






[1] Cf.: Fryberger, Betsy G.: Picasso: Graphic Magician, Stanford / New York 1999.




[2] Cf..: Beaucamp, Eduard: Der Modus der Linien und die Kunst der Möglichkeiten, in: Pablo Picasso, Eine Ausstellung


zum hundertsten Geburtstag, Werke aus der Sammlung Marina Picasso, Ausst.-Kat., Haus der Kunst München, Josef-Haubrich Kunsthalle Köln, Städelsches Kulturinstitut Frankfurt/M., Kunsthaus Zürich, München 1981,


p. 83-89, 83, as cited in: Picasso: Wort und Bekenntnis, Berlin 1957, p. 17f.